Nimrud Central Palace

By Levi Clancy for Student Reader on
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Assyrian king Tiglath-Pileser III (reign 744 - 727 BC) built the Central Palace at Nimrud.

nimrud central palace
Surrender of enemy horseman.
Assyrian, ~728 BC.
Nimrud Central Palace, re-used in SW Palace.
British Museum, W A 118905.

Assyrian king Tiglath-Pileser III (reign 744 - 727 BC) was one of the most successful Assyrian kings, campaigning as far north as Urartu (Ararat), east into Iran, west to the Mediterranean and south to the borders with Egypt. He transformed foreign kingdoms into provinces under rule of Assyrian governors. Toward the end of his reign, Tiglath-Pileser began to build the Central Palace at Nimrud, but it was never finished. Assyrian king Esarhaddon (reign 680 - 669 BC) chose to build the Southwest Palace at Nimrud, and when the archaeologist Austen Henry Layard excavated both palaces in the 1840s, he found many of the reliefs from the Central Palace had been stacked for removal to Esarhaddon's Southwest Palace, while others had already been moved. Few survive in good condition.

This wall-panel one of a series shows two disconnected scenes: above, attack on an enemy town; below, submission of an enemy. Shown here,

nimrud central palaceAssyrian ~728 BC. Nimrud Central Palace, re-used in Nimrud Southwest Palace. British Museum, WA 118933. Assyrian soldiers shoot at the city which appears (after a gap) on the panel on the left.

nimrud central palaceAssyrian ~728 BC. Nimrud Central Palace, re-used in Nimrud Southwest Palace. British Museum, WA 118933. Tiglath-Pileser III stands over a captured enemy. The writing in the middle describes the Assyrian campaign in Iran in 74 BC.