City of Promise: Race and Historical Change in Los Angeles

By Levi Clancy for Student Reader on
updated

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Edited by Martin Schiesl and Mark Morall Dodge.
PartChapterTitleAuthorshipPage

Part One: 1900-1945

§ 1

Mexican Immigrant Families: Cultural Survival and Adaptation in the Formation of Community in Los Angeles, 1900-1945

Gloria E Miranda

11

§ 2

Indispensable Scapegoats: Asians & Pacific Islanders in Pre-1945 Los Angeles

Donald and Nadine Hata

39

§ 3

"All Men Up and No Man Down": Black Angelenos Confront Refracted Racism, 1900-1940

Delores Nason McBroome

59

Part Two: After 1945

§ 4

Into the Mainstream: Asians & Pacific Islanders in Post-1945 Los Angeles

Nadine and Donald Hata

87

§ 5

A Simple Quest for Dignity: African American Los Angeles since World War II

Josh Sides

109

§ 6

Behind the Shield: Social Discomfort and the Los Angeles Police since 1950

Martin Schiesl

137

§ 7

Latino Los Angeles: The Promise of Politics

Kenneth C Burt

175

Chapter 1

Mexican Immigrant Families: Cultural Survival and Adaptation in the Formation of Community in Los Angeles, 1900-1945 by Gloria E Miranda

Chapter 2

Indispensable Scapegoats: Asians & Pacific Islanders in Pre-1945 Los Angeles by Donald and Nadine Hata

"Asians and Pacific Islanders resided in Mexico more than a century before the founding of Los Angeles. Filipinos had settled in Acapulco and a Chinese merchant enclave was firmly established in Mexico City. Most arrived as crew and passengers aboard the fabled Manila Galleons that connected Spain's colonies in the Philippines and Mexico as early as 1565.p39

Antonio Miranda Rodriguez was one of the original Pobladores and described as Chino in 1781 census, might have been the first Filipino in Los Angeles had he not stayed behind to care for a sick daughter.

Responding to the discovery of gold and railroad jobs in the northern part of the state, thousands of Chinese came to California in the 1850s. Most were from small villages around the port city of Canton in southern China. After working on the western portion of the trans-continental railroad, many moved south. By July 1876 Chinese comprised two-thirds of the 1,500 workers on p 39 → 40 the strategic San Fernando Tunnel that linked Los Aneles by rail to San Francisco. Chinese workers followed the Southern Pacific into Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Others constructed the great aqueduct which brought water to the parched Los Angeles basin. They looked to Chinatown for refuge between seasonal employment, and many remained to operate restaurants, laundries, and other small businesses. Community associations arbitrated disputes between members, loaned money, and provided social services. The associations were organized around villages and districts, clans and families, benevolent services, businesses and professions, and secret societies. p 39-40

The food we eat, including the nectarine, is influenced by Asian merchants (in that case Korean) who brought goods to the United States.

Chapter 3

"All Men Up and No Man Down": Black Angelenos Confront Refracted Racism, 1900-1940 by Delores Nason McBroome