Winged sun

By Levi Clancy for Student Reader on
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When you squint to look at the sun, the intense light will flare out and resemble a circle with wings.

It originated in Ancient Egypt.

By the time the ancient Assyrians used it, the symbol was already a popular symbol in the consciousness for power and a meaningful religious projection into art.

It was not only used by the Assyrians: it was also used broadly to represent other gods.

When it was adopted by the Zoroastrians, it came from this milieu.

The winged sun entered Europe's popular conscience with Napoleon's invasion of Egypt.

Silver soup tureen by Paul Storr, made 1806-1807. Neoclassical style. Fueled by ongoing archaeological discoveries of objects from ancient Mediterranean civilizations, the neoclassical style continued
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However, it had continued to be used by Zoroastrian communities.

Ceremonial bowl with Zoroastrian themes. Made in Burma, c 1875-1900. Silver. The bowl depicts scenes of victories of Zoroastrian rulers from ancient Persia, where the religion originated. On one side
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From there, it has entered popular culture in the form of the Chrysler logo and other brands.

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Silver soup tureen by Paul Storr, made 1806-1807. Neoclassical style. Fueled by ongoing archaeological discoveries of objects from ancient Mediterranean civilizations, the neoclassical style continued to combine and recombine classical motifs. Decorative schemes were made coherent by symmetry and repetition, with multiple items in a set either appearing more unified with a restrained style, or each made distinct with unique flourishes. This soup tureen from a set of four is remarkably ostentatious and blends dense ornamentation with an infusion of Egyptian motifs that became popular following Napoleon Bonaparte's 1798 invasion of Egypt.

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Ceremonial bowl with Zoroastrian themes. Made in Burma, c 1875-1900. Silver. The bowl depicts scenes of victories of Zoroastrian rulers from ancient Persia, where the religion originated. On one side is shown the triumph of Persian king Darius (550 - 486 BC) over a rival, and nearby is the winged disc which is associated with Zoroastrianism's supreme deity. On the other side is a Persian king humbling a defeated Roman ruler. Both scenes are based on ancient Persian reliefs of these events, so the bowl's maker must have been familiar with them from drawings, photographs, or other artworks. The bowl would have been used in Zoroastrian ceremonies honoring deceased relatives.

Fleeing Islamic persecution that began with the Muslim conquest of Persia, the Zoroastrians there began migrating to western India where they were often known as Parsis (the Persians). The Parsis in Mumbai — then Bombay — became leaders in banking and commerce, and sometimes sent relatives and colleagues to far-off cities as business representatives.

One city with a Paris business community in the 19th century was Rangoon, the capital of Burma. This bowl was made there, as indicated by the peacock design on the bottom (the peacock is one of Burma's national symbols) and features such as the ring of petals around the lower part of the bowl. This bowl is thought to have been commissioned by a member of a well-to-do member of the Parsi community there.

On display at San Francisco's Asian Art Museum. Acquired 2009, made possible by the Zarthosti Anjuman of Northern California, Rati Forbes, Betty N Alberts, and members of the board of the Society for Asian Art in honor of Past President Nazneen Spliedt.

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